Britannica Library

Award-Winning Resource That Everyone Can Use

Developed specifically for libraries, the new Britannica Library provides your patrons with access to three sites in one, with age appropriate material from the child-friendly collection through to the adult general reference collection. Now students from Primary to High School will find it easy to conduct research, complete homework assignments and work on special projects. From within the one safe site they can link to an appropriate encyclopedia article, Britannica-approved Web sites, Journals & Magazines, Multimedia, Compare Countries, an Atlas, thousands of Biographies and other learning materials. Older students and adults will find similar resources created for advanced information seekers to explore their area of special interest and everyone can save and share articles, images and videos in a personal account with My Britannica.
Remote access can also be provided.

So whether it’s frogs or physics, gardening or geography, Britannica Library covers it all and for all ages - students, business professionals and curious seniors. Extensive and thorough, fast and intuitive, this powerful collection delivers trustworthy information that your patrons need.

 Features:  
 
  • Primary Sources & eBooks
  • Video Collection
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  • EBSCO Journals & Magazines
  • Compare Countries
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  • News Feeds (local & international)
  • Web's Best Sites
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  • World Atlas
  • My Britannica
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  • Double-click Dictionary
  • Read-Aloud (text-to-speech)

  • Country Specific Sites Available:
    Australian States/Territories
    New Zealand
    Asia

     

     
     
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